Mersey basin Campaign

Items with region Manchester Ship Canal

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Publication dateMarch 2008 MBC128 Water Pressures With the amount of rain we get in the Northwest it is hard to believe that water could ever possibly be in short supply. In reality though, water supplies in the UK are already under serious threat, a threat which will only be exacerbated once climate change starts making an impact. With drier summers on the horizons water shortage will become a major issue not just for people, but for our environment as well. Matthew Sutcliffe takes a look at the bleak future of our region’s water supplies and examines United Utilities’ strategic direction statement that sets out its plans for coping with the challenges of climate change and our over-use of water. Publication dateDecember 2003 MBC047 Venice of the North Ben Willis reports on Manchester City Council's strategy for the regeneration of its waterways. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC018 Mersey People: The Seaman The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode former merchant seaman Alan Feast - who trained and sailed from Liverpool - talks about his career 'seeing the world for a living'. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC025 Mersey People: The Regulator The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Diane Walker, an Environment Agency regulator talks about her work, the problems of tracing pollution in the Mersey and its tributaries. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC027 Mersey People: The Engineer The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode former United Utilities engineer, Shanthi Rasaratnam discusses the engineering successes which have contributed to the impressive clean up of the River Mersey. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC147 On The Waterfront (book) Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as archaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter Peter de Figueiredo examines the changing physical landscape and built environment along the banks of the Mersey. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC144 Time and the river Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as archaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter Ian Wray introduces the book, and highlights some of the key themes. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC150 Crossings Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as srchaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter Deborah Mulhearn takes a look at how traders, travellers and locals have crossed the River Mersey.