Mersey basin Campaign

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Publication dateDecember 2009 MBC243 Partnership case study: Unilever PLC Case study focusing on the partnership between the Mersey Basin Campaign and Unilever PLC. The document examines the reasons for Unilever's involvement with the Campaign, the nature of their partnership, and draws out some of the benefits gained from the union. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC031 Mersey People: The Ranger The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Rachael Bennett, community parks officer from Mersey Vale Nature Park talks about the site - a former bleachworks on the riverbank in Heaton Mersey - its wildlife, and how the local community contributed to its regeneration. Publication dateSeptember 2009 MBC178 Thirteen from Twenty-five Source introduces the thirteen critical success factors that guided the Mersey Basin Campaign through 25 years of environmental action. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC159 Along The Banks Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as srchaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter David Ward takes us on a journey along the Mersey banks starting at the source above Stockport, and journeying to where the Mersey meets the sea in New Brighton. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC158 River Futures Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as srchaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter Steve Connor looks to the future, with the Mersey an important potential source of wind and wave power. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC155 Wild Mersey Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as srchaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter Chris Baines talks about the ecology and wildlife that inhabits the Mersey and its banks. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC153 Down To The Sea In Ships Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as archaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter Michael Taylor explores the Mersey's maritime and industrial heritage. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC152 Westward Ho! Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as archaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter Anthony Wilson explores the Mersey's role in the rise of rock music.