Mersey basin Campaign

Items with region Etherow & Goyt

Found 40 items. Page 1 2 3 4 5

Publication dateMarch 2008 MBC128 Water Pressures With the amount of rain we get in the Northwest it is hard to believe that water could ever possibly be in short supply. In reality though, water supplies in the UK are already under serious threat, a threat which will only be exacerbated once climate change starts making an impact. With drier summers on the horizons water shortage will become a major issue not just for people, but for our environment as well. Matthew Sutcliffe takes a look at the bleak future of our region’s water supplies and examines United Utilities’ strategic direction statement that sets out its plans for coping with the challenges of climate change and our over-use of water. Publication dateJune 2008 MBC134 Weir-ed and Wonderful During the industrial revolution mills generated their power by utilising the force of nearby rivers. Now in the 21st century micro-hydro schemes are popping up along our waterways using modern technology to generate green energy from our rivers. Jason Teasdale goes out to investigate various schemes located across the Northwest and learns about the challenges and opportunities faced by these small-scale hydropower schemes. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC025 Mersey People: The Regulator The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Diane Walker, an Environment Agency regulator talks about her work, the problems of tracing pollution in the Mersey and its tributaries. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC028 Mersey People: The Campaigner The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Peter Clarke, a local publican who has campaigned for the restoration of the iron bridge over the River Goyt in Brabyns Park, Marple, talks about his campaign and his love for the river. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC029 Mersey People: The Local Historian The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode Coral Dranfield, local historian talks about the Mersey's importance to Stockport's industrial past, and how it has shaped the town. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC031 Mersey People: The Ranger The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Rachael Bennett, community parks officer from Mersey Vale Nature Park talks about the site - a former bleachworks on the riverbank in Heaton Mersey - its wildlife, and how the local community contributed to its regeneration. Publication dateOctober 2007 MBC032 Mersey People: The Artist The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Stockport-based artist Helen Clapcott reflects on a lifetime of painting the Mersey through Stockport, and the difference in attitudes to the river between its beginning in Stockport and its traditional 'home' in Liverpool. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC033 Mersey People: The Community Archaeologist The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, community activist and archaeologist Tracy Lawley from Brinnington talks about Stockport's relationship with the Mersey, and a unique community archaeology project to connect people with their heritage.