Mersey basin Campaign

Items with region Upper Mersey

Found 65 items. Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Publication dateMarch 2008 MBC128 Water Pressures With the amount of rain we get in the Northwest it is hard to believe that water could ever possibly be in short supply. In reality though, water supplies in the UK are already under serious threat, a threat which will only be exacerbated once climate change starts making an impact. With drier summers on the horizons water shortage will become a major issue not just for people, but for our environment as well. Matthew Sutcliffe takes a look at the bleak future of our region’s water supplies and examines United Utilities’ strategic direction statement that sets out its plans for coping with the challenges of climate change and our over-use of water. Publication dateSeptember 2006 MBC008 Breathing new life into the Mersey: Water quality and fisheries in the Mersey Estuary - a historical perspective Taking a long-term perspective, this scientific paper provides detailed information about the effects of improvements in water quality on the fish population of the Mersey. Publication dateFebruary 1983 MBC009 Letter from Michael Heseltine and Government Consultation Paper (Department of the Environment, 1983) The document which proposed the idea for the Mersey Basin Campaign. Then Secretary of State for the Environment Michael Heseltine's letter lays down the challenge for Northwest England, proposing a long term, multi-partner campaign, and the accompanying government consultation paper sets out the possible aims and scope of such an organisation. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC016 Mersey People: The Canoeist The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Chris Cleaver of Canoe England discusses his experiences of canoeing on the Mersey, as well as his fight for canoe access to form the River Mersey Canoe Trail from Burnage to Sale. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC020 Mersey People: The Politician The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Lord Heseltine, former secretary of state for the environment talks about his experiences in Liverpool in the wake of the Toxteth riots, why he felt it was crucial to clean up the Mersey, and the inception of the Mersey Basin Campaign. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC022 Mersey People: The Conservator The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode Mary Kendrick, MBE, former Acting Conservator of the Mersey (1988-98) talks about the history of the Mersey Conservancy, her time as conservator and the geological and geomorphological importance of the Mersey estuary. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC019 Mersey People: The Publican The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode Dave Hall, landlord of the Jackson's Boat pub on the banks of the Mersey in Sale talks about the unique relationship between his livelihood and the river. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC025 Mersey People: The Regulator The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Diane Walker, an Environment Agency regulator talks about her work, the problems of tracing pollution in the Mersey and its tributaries.